Berry Eggplant Hat

One of the cutest baby hats I’ve seen has been the berry hat. With my new knitting skills at the ready, I made my very first berry hat. I was going for plum, but unfortunately, my husband informed me that it resembles more of an eggplant! I guess children love eggplants, because the little girl that received it has practically worn it out!

The pattern comes from Michele Sabatier which I found on Ravelry.com. I used size 8 double pointed needles and Simply Soft yarn. It is a quick and easy pattern. I highly recommend it.

Side-view Mirror Cozy – Rectangle


A side-view mirror cozy/cover is a quick way to personalize a vehicle, whether yours or someone else’s.   (The ninja was for my husband. The dog paw was a yarn bomb on my brother-in-law!) While I can’t give specific directions to fit every side-view mirror, I can give basic directions that will work for most rectangular shaped mirrors (or mirrors that are kind of rectangular in shape).  For a mostly rectangular shaped mirror, you will crochet a rectangle, then make it 3-dimensional by doing the sides. By leaving one of the edges unconnected, the cozy can be brought around the front and buttoned closed so that it can be quickly attached or removed. The pictures below will explain.

Click Side-view Mirror Cozy – Rectangle for a PDF version.

Materials:

Yarn: Acrylic medium worsted weight of your choice. I chose black so that it would be a little subtle and because that was the color of the mirror to begin with. I don’t think my husband would cotton to a bright colored mirror cozy!

Hook: Size L (or size desired to get gauge or tightness of stitches)

Needle: If you plan to decorate the cozy, a large needle will be needed to sew on objects.

Button: The button should fit between stitches but not be so little that it doesn’t stay fastened.

Abbreviations:

Dc = double crochet

Sc = single crochet

Step 1: Measure

First, measure the size of the mirror: back, top, bottom, and sides. There should be somewhat of a basic rectangular shape to the back of the mirror. If you are lucky, the two sides will be a similar size and the top and bottom will be similar. If not, you may have to change your stitches as you go. The mirror above is basically 9 inches wide, 6 inches tall, and 2.5 inches deep.

Step 2: Gauge

With a size L hook, I get about 3 stitches and 2 rows to an inch. With a size H hook, I get about 4 stitches per inch.

Step 3: Make the Base Rectangle

Using a size L hook, figure 3 stitches per inch. Multiply the number of inches the back of the mirror is from side to side by 3. (My mirror was 9 inches wide. 9×3=27). That’s how many chains stitches to make.

Chain 27 (or however many your mirror needs.)

Row 1: Chain 2 more (to count as the first dc). Dc in 4th chain from hook and each chain across. (27)

Row 2: Chain 2 (count as first dc), turn, dc across.

Row 3-7: Chain 2, turn, dc across. (*Note: you may need to do more or fewer than 7 rows depending on the height of your mirror.)

Step 4: Make the Sides/Top/Bottom

Determine which corner of the rectangle will go where the mirror attaches to the side of the vehicle. For instance, while looking at the back of the driver’s side mirror, the corner that attaches to the vehicle is usually the bottom left corner. In that case, the left side will not be attached to the bottom part of the project as it is made. (See picture above. Cozy pictured is facing the wrong way. It looks like the bottom right is not attached, but when it is turned and put on the truck, it will be the bottom left. If you do the wrong side, the cozy can be turned inside out and used!)

Row 8: Chain 2, turn; dc to the end. Turn the work to crochet down the side. Make 2 dc on each dc post to the end. Turn the work to crochet along the bottom (which was your initial chain). Dc in each stitch to the end. Turn the work to crochet along the last side. Work 2 dc on each dc post to the end. DO NOT JOIN! Chain 2, turn.

Row 9: Dc in each stitch around. Chain 2, turn.

Row 10: Dc in each stitch around.

(*Note: You  may want to check the project on the mirror it will go on, if possible. This will give you an idea of whether you need to do any more rows.)

Continue making dc rows until the width of the mirror is met. It is best if the cozy fits snuggly.

Row 11/Last Row: Sc dec (sc 2 together) around. Do not join. Cut yarn, weave in end.

Make sure the cozy fits. Figure out which corner you will sew the button to.

Sew on the button.

Crochet decorations or add decorations as desired. See pattern below for dog paw print.

Large Paw Pad

Chain 5

Row 1: Skip the first 3 chains. Dc in last two  chains. Chain 2, turn.

Row 2: Dc in 3rd from hook, dc, 2 dc in last stitch. Chain 2, turn.

Row 3: Dc in 3rd from hook, 3 dc, 2 dc in last  stitch. Chain 2, turn.

Row 4: Dc in 3rd from hook, dc, 3 slip stitch, dc, 2 dc in last stitch

Toes (make 4):

Chain 2

Row 1: Sc in 2nd chain from hook. Chain 1, turn.

Row 2: 2 sc in the stitch, chain 1, turn.

Row 3: 2sc, chain 1, turn

Row 3: 1 sc dec (single crochet 2 together). Cut yarn leaving a long tail for sewing.

Notes

*Some mirrors may have tapered sides that are narrower at the top and wider at the bottom. In this case, I suggest making sc’s along the narrow sections and dc on the wider sections. For example, when working on the side piece, do half the stitches dc and half of them sc (or a third of each with hdc stitches in between). This will allow for the cozy to fit more snuggly and prevent the cozy from covering up too much of the mirror on the front.

**These directions are made with dc’s around. This leaves gaps between stitches, but allows the cozy to stretch more easily. The cozy can be made with sc’s. Simply adjust for gauge. It will more than likely start with the same number of stitches on the foundation chain, just require more rows to get the height and depth.

Weaving in Ends

Though weaving in ends may never be an enjoyable part of knitting and crocheting, there are a couple things you can do to make it more enjoyable, and maybe almost fun!

Tip #1: Leave an end long enough to weave in with a large needle. Before purchasing a needle long enough for yarn, I used a crochet hook to pull the end through stitches. Occasionally I still forget to leave a long tail and have to use a crochet hook though it’s much faster to use a needle.

Tip #2: If you are still going to crochet or knit, the end(s) can be crocheted over and locked into the stitches or knit with for several stitches. Crocheting over or knitting with the tails for 5 or 6 stitches will usually be enough to lock the tails in.

Tip #3: Use a smaller crochet hook than used for the project. The hook will fit in the stitches easier and quicker.

Tip #4: After weaving in the end(s), pull the tail a little tightly so the project almost puckers a little. Cut the end(s) close to the project; then straighten the project so the end hides in the stitches.

Recently a group of us made a bunch of scarves for the Special Olympics. One knitter didn’t have a crochet hook to weave in the tails at the color changes. Thankfully she left long tails that I could tuck in with a needles. With the needle I could make quick work of the task and almost enjoyed it!

Blue Butterfly Pillow

The beautiful blue butterfly has long been one of my favorites. Using single crochet and a little Fair Isle, I made this pillow. This beautiful blue butterfly is crocheted right into the pillow! Though I used Fair Isle, this could be made using the intarsia method or by simply cutting and tying on the the colors of yarn as needed. Below are the basic instructions.

Blue Butterfly Pillow Pattern

Click on Blue Butterfly Pillow for the pattern which includes the chart for the front of the pillow.

Materials

Yarn: Remnants of 4 colors of medium worsted weight

Pictured: Red Heart Super Saver pink (color not lettered on the grid), black (color A on grid), blue (B), and turqua (C)

Hook: Size H, or hook to get gauge or to get the size of pillow desired.

Beads: 16 – 4mm sized beads; 8 pink and 8 blue

Needle: Large sewing needles to sew veins of the butterfly wings

Gauge: 4 stitches and 4 rows = 1 inch

Dimensions of Finished Pillow: 9  ¾ x 6 ¾

Abbreviations:

Ch = chain

Dc = double crochet

Sc = single crochet

St = stitches

YO = yarn over

Front

Chain 40

Row 1: starting in second chain from hook, sc across. Chain 1, turn. (39)

Row 2-3: Skip ch-1 space, sc across. Chain 1, turn. (39)

Rows 4-25: Follow the color guide using the grid/chart  to change colors. A = black (or color 1), B = Blue (or color 2), C = turqua (or color 3), and the empty spaces are pink (or color 4). Cut yarn, weave in end. Click on Blue Butterfly Pillow for the chart.

Sew beads onto black area of the butterfly wings as shown in the picture.

For extra dimension, another layer of the butterfly can be crocheted on top of the black body portion. This can be done by crocheting around the posts of the pillow and dc in short 2 dc long rows.

Sew antennae to the head of the butterfly.

Using blue, stitch veins on the butterfly’s wings. Follow the picture or create your own pattern.

Back

Chain 40

Row 1: starting in second chain from hook, *sc and dc in same stitch, skip a stitch* across to last two stitches. Sc in last stitch. Chain 1, turn.

Row 2-17: Skip chain 1 space, *sc and dc in same stitch, skip a stitch* across to last two stitchs. Sc in last stitch. Do not cut yarn.

*Note: You may need to do more or less rows to make the back side the same height as the front side.

Edging

Put the front and back pieces together, wrong sides in (facing each other).

Round 1: Reverse sc around, 1 reverse sc per stitch/row and 3 in each corner. Cut yarn, weave in loose end.

Fair Isle Crocheting

Fair Isle crocheting is when colors are “carried” along and used when needed. The unneeded yarn for the stitch is actually crocheted on top of so that the strand can be brought along and hidden until it is needed. Then the needed color is used and the unneeded color is crocheted on top of. To make sure the color changes are seamless, the new color is used to complete the last part of the previous stitch (see Note A). In order to prevent having to tie a bunch of knots, a color can be carried for 5 stitches before it is going to be used. This will lock the yarn into place and it will be ready to be used when that color comes up in the pattern.

A problem with Fair Isle crocheting with multiple colors is that when several colors are carried, the stitches become bigger around and the work can begin to bow. This is less likely to occur in intarsia crocheting. Multiple strands can also result in the balls of yarn becoming easily tangled. Using smaller balls that can be more easily moved around can help make this less of a chore.

*Note A: To change colors, complete all but the last part of the stitch of the old color. The new color should be used for the last YO and pull through the loops. For example, a sc is made by inserting the hook into the stitch, YO, pull through the stitch, YO and pull through 2 loops on the hook. When changing colors, the first YO is done in the old color, the second YO and pull through the two loops on the hook is done in the new color.

Intarsia

Intarsia crocheting is when there is a ball/bobbin of yarn for each color change. The yarn is “dropped” at the end of the use and picked back up and used on the next row on the way back. Dropped yarn is left dangling on one side of the work. Like Fair Isle, the old color does most of the last stitch of the old color; the new color should be used to complete the last YO of the stitch. (See Note A for a more detailed explanation.)

***When crocheting with Fair Isle or Intarsia, it may be necessary to “carry” a color for a few/several stitches if the color will start a few/several stitches earlier in the next row. This will prevent a length of stranded yarn from appearing in the work.

***It is best to choose a front/right side when making the butterfly section. Dropping and picking up yarn from the front or back can affect how well stitches look and how well strands are hidden.

Median Sign Yarn Tag

This median sign looked a little chilly.  A little sweater ought to keep it warm. Located in Colorado Springs, this yarn bomb tag is made from various types of yarn using a size L hook.

Max of Where the Wild Things Are

Where the Wild Things Are was one of my favorite books as a child. I decided to make a Max doll for a nephew for Christmas. Based on Morgan’s pattern, this little Max doll was modified in several areas.

Crocheted with a size E hook using Red Heart yarn, this adorable Max doll has a removable crown and a hood that does down. The hair is hooked on one strand at a time and trimmed to the desired height. I decided to make crocheted claws on the hands and feet. The ends of the hands and feet also have pads like a wolf. The scepter is sewn into Max’s hand. There are also whiskers attached to the hood. The tail is made from grey fun yarn.

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Pillar Monster Feet

Make any pillar or post look like a monster with this fun monster foot yarn bomb. This park now has a monster of its own, with two feet, one on each basketball hoop! This monster is in Colorado Springs, though they have family all over. These particular monster feet were made with blue and yellow Red Heart yarn and a size L hook.

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These monster feet can also go at the bottom of pillars on homes and can have as many toes as you’d like. 3-4 is standard, though prehensile feet could have opposable thumbs, and freakish monsters could have countless toes! The monster foot at this house has a flag holder growing out of its foot!

Follow these basic instructions to make one of your own!

Monster Feet Pattern

Materials

Yarn: Two colors of any yarn will do. Blue and yellow medium weight acrylic is pictured.

Hook: size L (7.5 mm) [*Note: Use a smaller size hook to make monster feet more proportional for smaller pillars and posts.)

Yarn Needle

Stuffing

Abbreviation: hdc = half double crochet

Gauge: 3 hdc = 1 inch wide, 2hdc rows = 1 inch

Pillar Cozy/Foot Part (Color A)

Determine the circumference/length around the object being covered. Multiply that number times 3 to find how many chain stitches to make.

Row 1: hdc in 3rd stitch from hook and in every chain space to the end. Chain 2, turn.

Rows 2-10: Count the chain 2 spaces as the first hdc. Hdc to the end. Chain 2, turn. On the last row, do not chain 2. Cut and weave in end.

*Note: Make the pillar cozy as tall or short as you’d like. You may want more or less than 10 rows.

Toes:

(Color B)

Chain 2

Round 1: 4 hdc in 2nd chain from hook. (4)

Round 2: 2 hdc in first stitch, hdc in next 3 stitch. (5)

Round 3: 2 hdc in first stitch, hdc in next 4 stitches. Cut and weave in end. (6)

(Switch to color A)

Round 4: 2 hdc in each stitch around (12).

Round 5-10: hdc in each stitch around. Cut and weave in end.

Stuff toes with stuffing; sew onto bottom edge of the pillar cozy/foot part. Sew on 3 or 4 toes. Leave a space between two toes  if one is a prehensile toe. Sew the cozy to the base of a pillar or post of your choice.

Converse Baby Booties

Suzanne Resaul made this crocheted Converse baby booties available on Ravelry and I just had to make them for my niece. They were well received, though I would probably modify them a bit to stay on the baby’s foot better. Perfect for the little one that will keep the parents running!

The shoelaces are long chains. The tops have been glued to give them the shoelace look. The yarn is Lion Brand Baby Soft crocheted with a size E hook (I think).

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*Note: The shoes are not intended for athletic purposes.

Side-view Mirror Cozy

I asked my husband if he would mind me tagging his truck with a yarn bomb. He said no because he couldn’t imagine where I could tag it! Though I have a place in mind for a later tag, he suggested a side-view mirror cozy. I went right home a crocheted one up! The first one ended up being a yarn bomb on my brother-in-laws truck. Since I didn’t have access to the truck, I made a cozy to fit my vehicle since they are both Nissans. I decided to put a dog paw on it since they have a dog. I wanted to make a pink paw because their dog is a girl, but I was afraid my brother-in-law would take it off immediately!

The cozy turned out so well, I decided to make a cozy for my Nissan. I was going to put a bike on it, but my husband requested a ninja. Both of them are secured with a button so they can be removed and washed. I put the cozy on my brother-in-law’s truck when they were away from home. Still waiting to see when they discover it! Unfortunately his mirror is smaller than mine. Not as good a fit, but still workable.

Turns out my mother let the cat out of the bag. I ended up telling my sister where to look! She still enjoyed it.

Sunflower Tag

Spotted on the corner of Tutt and Stetson Hills in Colorado Springs, these “giant” sunflowers don’t seem so giant! I guess giant is relative. There are three sunflowers on this pillar. They get smaller depending on perspective/distance. They seem large when walking by them. To drivers they are hardly noticeable!  The groundhog said it would be an early Spring. I don’t think he meant February 3! Perhaps these can help bring in the sun.

Crocheted using Red Heart yarn and a size L hook.

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