Blue Butterfly Pillow

The beautiful blue butterfly has long been one of my favorites. Using single crochet and a little Fair Isle, I made this pillow. This beautiful blue butterfly is crocheted right into the pillow! Though I used Fair Isle, this could be made using the intarsia method or by simply cutting and tying on the the colors of yarn as needed. Below are the basic instructions.

Blue Butterfly Pillow Pattern

Click on Blue Butterfly Pillow for the pattern which includes the chart for the front of the pillow.

Materials

Yarn: Remnants of 4 colors of medium worsted weight

Pictured: Red Heart Super Saver pink (color not lettered on the grid), black (color A on grid), blue (B), and turqua (C)

Hook: Size H, or hook to get gauge or to get the size of pillow desired.

Beads: 16 – 4mm sized beads; 8 pink and 8 blue

Needle: Large sewing needles to sew veins of the butterfly wings

Gauge: 4 stitches and 4 rows = 1 inch

Dimensions of Finished Pillow: 9  ¾ x 6 ¾

Abbreviations:

Ch = chain

Dc = double crochet

Sc = single crochet

St = stitches

YO = yarn over

Front

Chain 40

Row 1: starting in second chain from hook, sc across. Chain 1, turn. (39)

Row 2-3: Skip ch-1 space, sc across. Chain 1, turn. (39)

Rows 4-25: Follow the color guide using the grid/chart  to change colors. A = black (or color 1), B = Blue (or color 2), C = turqua (or color 3), and the empty spaces are pink (or color 4). Cut yarn, weave in end. Click on Blue Butterfly Pillow for the chart.

Sew beads onto black area of the butterfly wings as shown in the picture.

For extra dimension, another layer of the butterfly can be crocheted on top of the black body portion. This can be done by crocheting around the posts of the pillow and dc in short 2 dc long rows.

Sew antennae to the head of the butterfly.

Using blue, stitch veins on the butterfly’s wings. Follow the picture or create your own pattern.

Back

Chain 40

Row 1: starting in second chain from hook, *sc and dc in same stitch, skip a stitch* across to last two stitches. Sc in last stitch. Chain 1, turn.

Row 2-17: Skip chain 1 space, *sc and dc in same stitch, skip a stitch* across to last two stitchs. Sc in last stitch. Do not cut yarn.

*Note: You may need to do more or less rows to make the back side the same height as the front side.

Edging

Put the front and back pieces together, wrong sides in (facing each other).

Round 1: Reverse sc around, 1 reverse sc per stitch/row and 3 in each corner. Cut yarn, weave in loose end.

Fair Isle Crocheting

Fair Isle crocheting is when colors are “carried” along and used when needed. The unneeded yarn for the stitch is actually crocheted on top of so that the strand can be brought along and hidden until it is needed. Then the needed color is used and the unneeded color is crocheted on top of. To make sure the color changes are seamless, the new color is used to complete the last part of the previous stitch (see Note A). In order to prevent having to tie a bunch of knots, a color can be carried for 5 stitches before it is going to be used. This will lock the yarn into place and it will be ready to be used when that color comes up in the pattern.

A problem with Fair Isle crocheting with multiple colors is that when several colors are carried, the stitches become bigger around and the work can begin to bow. This is less likely to occur in intarsia crocheting. Multiple strands can also result in the balls of yarn becoming easily tangled. Using smaller balls that can be more easily moved around can help make this less of a chore.

*Note A: To change colors, complete all but the last part of the stitch of the old color. The new color should be used for the last YO and pull through the loops. For example, a sc is made by inserting the hook into the stitch, YO, pull through the stitch, YO and pull through 2 loops on the hook. When changing colors, the first YO is done in the old color, the second YO and pull through the two loops on the hook is done in the new color.

Intarsia

Intarsia crocheting is when there is a ball/bobbin of yarn for each color change. The yarn is “dropped” at the end of the use and picked back up and used on the next row on the way back. Dropped yarn is left dangling on one side of the work. Like Fair Isle, the old color does most of the last stitch of the old color; the new color should be used to complete the last YO of the stitch. (See Note A for a more detailed explanation.)

***When crocheting with Fair Isle or Intarsia, it may be necessary to “carry” a color for a few/several stitches if the color will start a few/several stitches earlier in the next row. This will prevent a length of stranded yarn from appearing in the work.

***It is best to choose a front/right side when making the butterfly section. Dropping and picking up yarn from the front or back can affect how well stitches look and how well strands are hidden.

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Comments

  1. Angel Thornton says:

    THIS IS AWESOME! Can you please turn this into a knit pattern.

    • bagleybiker says:

      I’m afraid I am not qualified to translate a crochet pattern into a knit one! This is graph based pattern. Rather than chaining a certain number, there would be a cast on. Whatever the pattern says for chains at the beginning, it would be one less for the cast on. Other than following the chart, I cannot give any knitting advice! Sorry about that.

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