Skull Cap for Logan

One of the kids in the youth group saw the skull hat I knit for my husband and he asked if I could make him one. Because I crochet faster than I knit, I decided to design a crocheted one for him. The hat is made starting from the brim and works to the top. The brim is crocheted in rows in the rib stitch. This pattern assumes you already know how to change colors when crocheting and how to read a chart. You can use the fair isle or intarsia method for changing colors.  I did a modified fair isle where I stranded the yarn not used in the back for about every other stitch and crochet over top the unused color every other stitch just in the area where the skull pattern was. I did not carry the red yarn around the back of the hat. I started a new piece of red yarn for each row. This made for quite a few ends to weave in, but kept the inside of the hat neat and clean looking.

 

Materials

Yarn: Two colors of medium worsted weight yarn of your choice: hat color (black) and skull color (red). Red Heart yarn is pictured.

Hook: H/8/5.00mm

Skull Chart in PDF format

Yarn Needle for sewing in ends (optional)

Gauge: 3 sc = 1 inch; 3 rows = 1 inch

Size Made: 8 inches from brim to top and 10 ½ inches across when laid flat. This fits a teen/adult female head.

 

Abbreviations

Ch = chain

Dec = crochet two together

Rnd = round

Sc = single crochet

Sc dec = single crochet two stitches together

Sl St = slip stitch

St = stitch

 

Hat Instructions

Black (or hat color)

Ch 6

Row 1: Sc in second ch from hook and next four ch stitches. (5)

Row 2-68: Ch 1, turn. Sc in back loops only of each st across. (5)

Row 69: Bring rows 1 and 68 together to form the brim of the hat making sure it’s not twisted. Sc row 1 to row 68. (5)

 

From this point forward you will be working in rounds. Turn the brim so you can work along the end/top of each row.

Rnd 1: Sc on the end of each row. Join with a slip stitch. (68)

Rnd 2: Ch 1, 31 sc. Start the skull pattern from the chart.The 31 sc takes you to the first color change at the bottom of the chart where the teeth start. The chart is read from right to left. Each stitch not on the chart, the back side of the hat, is done in single crochet with no increases or decreases. When you get to the end of the round, do not join. Continue working in rounds. (68)

Rnd 3: Skip the ch 1 stitch from rnd 2. Continue around using the chart as a guide.

Rnd 4-18: Use the chart to complete the skull pattern. Each stitch not on the chart is single crocheted with no increases or decreases. There are three decreases in each of the rows 16-18. The blackened spaces on the chart should be ignored as they are the stitches taken out by the decreases of previous rows. They do not count as single crochets or decreases. Consider them non-stitches.

Stitch count after each decrease round:

Rnd 16 (65)

Rnd 17 (62)

Rnd 18 (59)

 

59 stitches left after completing the skull pattern.

Rnd 19: 3 sc. *Dec, 6 sc* seven times. (52)

Rnd 20: 3 sc. *Dec, 5 sc* seven times. (45)

Rnd 21: 3 sc. *Dec, 4 sc* seven times. (38)

Rnd 22: 3 sc. *Dec, 3 sc* seven times. (31)

Rnd 23: 3 sc. *Dec, 2 sc* seven times. (24)

Rnd 24: 3 sc. *Dec, sc* seven times. (17)

Rnd 25: Sc. *Dec* seven times.(10)

Rnd 26: Dec five times. (5)

Finish off. Cut yarn leaving a long tail. Pull yarn through each of the remaining stitches and pull tight to close the top. Weave in end.

 

For a taller hat, I did fewer decreases in each row. For the very long hat I did about 1-2 decreases per row and changed colors approximately every 8 rows.

 

Pom-Pom Topper

Ch 13

Row 1: Sc in second ch from hook, 11 sc. (12)

Cut yarn leaving a long tail for sewing to the top of the hat.

Make a pom-pom. Attach that to the end of the pom-pom topper.

 

How to make a simple pom-pom: For a quick and easy pom-pom, I wrap the yarn around my hand several times. The more wraps, the thicker the pom-pom. I pull the yarn off my hand and pull a piece of yarn through the middle and tie it tightly around the strands that used to be at the top of my hand. I cut the strands that were at the bottom of my hand and trim the ends so they are somewhat even. The pom-pom can then be attached to the topper. I use the same piece of yarn that I used to tie the pom-pom.

 

Horse Tapestry Yarn Bomb

I suspect my brother finds my yarn fetish a little odd. I mean how many attractive practical uses are there for crocheted or knitted projects? I also suspect that he finds yarn bombing a little pointless. Which is why he was the perfect candidate for a yarn bomb! His wife loves horses, so I made a horse tapestry for their gate.

I originally intended to hang the tapestry on the main part of the front gate, but it is not constructed well for it. I ended up putting it on the side part.

The tapestry is attached to cozies wrapped around the bars. The cozies are made with a size N hook done in double crochets. The tapestry itself is made with single crochets using a size L hook. I transfered a woodcutting image onto graph paper in order to crochet the image. The yarn is Red Heart Super Saver. The mood was crocheted separately and sewn on. I didn’t think a circle would show up as nicely in the tapestry.

I put it up before a snowstorm blew in. I hope my brother and his wife see it before it gets snow covered!

Blue Butterfly Pillow

The beautiful blue butterfly has long been one of my favorites. Using single crochet and a little Fair Isle, I made this pillow. This beautiful blue butterfly is crocheted right into the pillow! Though I used Fair Isle, this could be made using the intarsia method or by simply cutting and tying on the the colors of yarn as needed. Below are the basic instructions.

Blue Butterfly Pillow Pattern

Click on Blue Butterfly Pillow for the pattern which includes the chart for the front of the pillow.

Materials

Yarn: Remnants of 4 colors of medium worsted weight

Pictured: Red Heart Super Saver pink (color not lettered on the grid), black (color A on grid), blue (B), and turqua (C)

Hook: Size H, or hook to get gauge or to get the size of pillow desired.

Beads: 16 – 4mm sized beads; 8 pink and 8 blue

Needle: Large sewing needles to sew veins of the butterfly wings

Gauge: 4 stitches and 4 rows = 1 inch

Dimensions of Finished Pillow: 9  ¾ x 6 ¾

Abbreviations:

Ch = chain

Dc = double crochet

Sc = single crochet

St = stitches

YO = yarn over

Front

Chain 40

Row 1: starting in second chain from hook, sc across. Chain 1, turn. (39)

Row 2-3: Skip ch-1 space, sc across. Chain 1, turn. (39)

Rows 4-25: Follow the color guide using the grid/chart  to change colors. A = black (or color 1), B = Blue (or color 2), C = turqua (or color 3), and the empty spaces are pink (or color 4). Cut yarn, weave in end. Click on Blue Butterfly Pillow for the chart.

Sew beads onto black area of the butterfly wings as shown in the picture.

For extra dimension, another layer of the butterfly can be crocheted on top of the black body portion. This can be done by crocheting around the posts of the pillow and dc in short 2 dc long rows.

Sew antennae to the head of the butterfly.

Using blue, stitch veins on the butterfly’s wings. Follow the picture or create your own pattern.

Back

Chain 40

Row 1: starting in second chain from hook, *sc and dc in same stitch, skip a stitch* across to last two stitches. Sc in last stitch. Chain 1, turn.

Row 2-17: Skip chain 1 space, *sc and dc in same stitch, skip a stitch* across to last two stitchs. Sc in last stitch. Do not cut yarn.

*Note: You may need to do more or less rows to make the back side the same height as the front side.

Edging

Put the front and back pieces together, wrong sides in (facing each other).

Round 1: Reverse sc around, 1 reverse sc per stitch/row and 3 in each corner. Cut yarn, weave in loose end.

Fair Isle Crocheting

Fair Isle crocheting is when colors are “carried” along and used when needed. The unneeded yarn for the stitch is actually crocheted on top of so that the strand can be brought along and hidden until it is needed. Then the needed color is used and the unneeded color is crocheted on top of. To make sure the color changes are seamless, the new color is used to complete the last part of the previous stitch (see Note A). In order to prevent having to tie a bunch of knots, a color can be carried for 5 stitches before it is going to be used. This will lock the yarn into place and it will be ready to be used when that color comes up in the pattern.

A problem with Fair Isle crocheting with multiple colors is that when several colors are carried, the stitches become bigger around and the work can begin to bow. This is less likely to occur in intarsia crocheting. Multiple strands can also result in the balls of yarn becoming easily tangled. Using smaller balls that can be more easily moved around can help make this less of a chore.

*Note A: To change colors, complete all but the last part of the stitch of the old color. The new color should be used for the last YO and pull through the loops. For example, a sc is made by inserting the hook into the stitch, YO, pull through the stitch, YO and pull through 2 loops on the hook. When changing colors, the first YO is done in the old color, the second YO and pull through the two loops on the hook is done in the new color.

Intarsia

Intarsia crocheting is when there is a ball/bobbin of yarn for each color change. The yarn is “dropped” at the end of the use and picked back up and used on the next row on the way back. Dropped yarn is left dangling on one side of the work. Like Fair Isle, the old color does most of the last stitch of the old color; the new color should be used to complete the last YO of the stitch. (See Note A for a more detailed explanation.)

***When crocheting with Fair Isle or Intarsia, it may be necessary to “carry” a color for a few/several stitches if the color will start a few/several stitches earlier in the next row. This will prevent a length of stranded yarn from appearing in the work.

***It is best to choose a front/right side when making the butterfly section. Dropping and picking up yarn from the front or back can affect how well stitches look and how well strands are hidden.

School Zone Cozy

This school zone speed limit sign got cozied. Located near Odyssey Elementary in Colorado Springs, this post got a snowflake coat for winter. My sister said it looked like spiders crawling up the post. Now, of course, all I can see is spiders! I hope it doesn’t freak the kids out. The snowflake pattern was done with a little Fair Isle and intarsia. The yarn was Red Heart; hook size L.

Fair Isle vs. Intarsia

Back in 1994 I crocheted a Precious Moments afghan for my parents. Up until this project I thought one only used one color at a time when crocheting. However, I wanted to make the afghan with multiple colors. I simply cut and tied together the colors as they came up. I had never heard of Fair Isle or intarsia. If only I had! I probably could have finished the project a little faster, though the end result would have been much the same.

What are Fair Isle and intarsia? They are forms of changing colors while knitting or crocheting. More commonly associated with knitting, Fair Isle and intarsia can be used successfully with single crochet. Though both result in projects with images or patterns, how the color is changed is different. The Precious Moments afghan was done in a format similar to intarsia though not in true fashion since I cut the yarn and tied on the new color at each color change.

Fair Isle crochet scarves for 2011 Special Olympics

Fair Isle

In Fair Isle knitting or crocheting, two or more colors are used and carried along to be used as the pattern calls for it. It is carried loosely in the back when knitting and crocheted over/on top of when crocheting. Traditional Fair isle uses two colors per row or round. Two colors for knitting leaves only one color “stranded” alongthe back/wrong side. Two colors for crocheting means only one strand of yarn is hidden or crocheted over. The disadvantage of carrying multiple strands when crocheting is that it gets harder to to hide multiple strands as the stitches gets thicker around. This can also distort the size of the row.

Fair Isle knit skull hat

Intarsia

Intarsia is the use of multiple colors on multiple balls or bobbins. Each color is used and then dropped when the color is changed. The appropriate strand of yarn is picked back up and used on the way back across the row. For knitting, this requires picking up the new color from under the old color so the yarn is twisted together and a hole is not formed. For crocheting, the color may still need to be carried on a previous row a stitch or two like in the Fair Isle method if the color does not resume right above the previous row.

Crocheted Fair Isle and Intarsia Pillow

Fair Isle and Intarsia often use charts rather than detailed row by row written instructions. These charts can be used for knitting and crocheting. The stitch sizes in knitting and crocheting are slightly different, but will still work well when single crocheted. Half double and double crochets elongate the stitches which will distort the image. There will also be longer strands made when picking up “dropped” yarn from previous rows.

Fair Isle and intarsia designs can be made from any graph. If you can graph it, you can knit/crochet it. The sky truly is the limit. Check out the Graph It post for some ideas on making your own graph.

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