Skull Cap for Logan

One of the kids in the youth group saw the skull hat I knit for my husband and he asked if I could make him one. Because I crochet faster than I knit, I decided to design a crocheted one for him. The hat is made starting from the brim and works to the top. The brim is crocheted in rows in the rib stitch. This pattern assumes you already know how to change colors when crocheting and how to read a chart. You can use the fair isle or intarsia method for changing colors.  I did a modified fair isle where I stranded the yarn not used in the back for about every other stitch and crochet over top the unused color every other stitch just in the area where the skull pattern was. I did not carry the red yarn around the back of the hat. I started a new piece of red yarn for each row. This made for quite a few ends to weave in, but kept the inside of the hat neat and clean looking.

 

Materials

Yarn: Two colors of medium worsted weight yarn of your choice: hat color (black) and skull color (red). Red Heart yarn is pictured.

Hook: H/8/5.00mm

Skull Chart in PDF format

Yarn Needle for sewing in ends (optional)

Gauge: 3 sc = 1 inch; 3 rows = 1 inch

Size Made: 8 inches from brim to top and 10 ½ inches across when laid flat. This fits a teen/adult female head.

 

Abbreviations

Ch = chain

Dec = crochet two together

Rnd = round

Sc = single crochet

Sc dec = single crochet two stitches together

Sl St = slip stitch

St = stitch

 

Hat Instructions

Black (or hat color)

Ch 6

Row 1: Sc in second ch from hook and next four ch stitches. (5)

Row 2-68: Ch 1, turn. Sc in back loops only of each st across. (5)

Row 69: Bring rows 1 and 68 together to form the brim of the hat making sure it’s not twisted. Sc row 1 to row 68. (5)

 

From this point forward you will be working in rounds. Turn the brim so you can work along the end/top of each row.

Rnd 1: Sc on the end of each row. Join with a slip stitch. (68)

Rnd 2: Ch 1, 31 sc. Start the skull pattern from the chart.The 31 sc takes you to the first color change at the bottom of the chart where the teeth start. The chart is read from right to left. Each stitch not on the chart, the back side of the hat, is done in single crochet with no increases or decreases. When you get to the end of the round, do not join. Continue working in rounds. (68)

Rnd 3: Skip the ch 1 stitch from rnd 2. Continue around using the chart as a guide.

Rnd 4-18: Use the chart to complete the skull pattern. Each stitch not on the chart is single crocheted with no increases or decreases. There are three decreases in each of the rows 16-18. The blackened spaces on the chart should be ignored as they are the stitches taken out by the decreases of previous rows. They do not count as single crochets or decreases. Consider them non-stitches.

Stitch count after each decrease round:

Rnd 16 (65)

Rnd 17 (62)

Rnd 18 (59)

 

59 stitches left after completing the skull pattern.

Rnd 19: 3 sc. *Dec, 6 sc* seven times. (52)

Rnd 20: 3 sc. *Dec, 5 sc* seven times. (45)

Rnd 21: 3 sc. *Dec, 4 sc* seven times. (38)

Rnd 22: 3 sc. *Dec, 3 sc* seven times. (31)

Rnd 23: 3 sc. *Dec, 2 sc* seven times. (24)

Rnd 24: 3 sc. *Dec, sc* seven times. (17)

Rnd 25: Sc. *Dec* seven times.(10)

Rnd 26: Dec five times. (5)

Finish off. Cut yarn leaving a long tail. Pull yarn through each of the remaining stitches and pull tight to close the top. Weave in end.

 

For a taller hat, I did fewer decreases in each row. For the very long hat I did about 1-2 decreases per row and changed colors approximately every 8 rows.

 

Pom-Pom Topper

Ch 13

Row 1: Sc in second ch from hook, 11 sc. (12)

Cut yarn leaving a long tail for sewing to the top of the hat.

Make a pom-pom. Attach that to the end of the pom-pom topper.

 

How to make a simple pom-pom: For a quick and easy pom-pom, I wrap the yarn around my hand several times. The more wraps, the thicker the pom-pom. I pull the yarn off my hand and pull a piece of yarn through the middle and tie it tightly around the strands that used to be at the top of my hand. I cut the strands that were at the bottom of my hand and trim the ends so they are somewhat even. The pom-pom can then be attached to the topper. I use the same piece of yarn that I used to tie the pom-pom.

 

Graph It!

Why does it seem that knitters have more fun with grids and intarsia? Pictures, patterns, and color changes are fun and easy with crocheting as well. Simple designs and more complex pictures can be turned into graphs and made into scarves, blankets, hats and more.

After seeing Peggy Jean Kaylor’s Special Olympics logo scarf on Ravelry and Crafty Knit Chick’s  star scarf, I decided to make my own chart using grid paper. I chose a snowflake since I wanted to make a scarf for the Special Olympics winter games.

My first pattern was tested by my sister and was a disaster! I designed a pattern with lines that were only one stitch wide. It made it hard to see the design clearly.

Tip 1: Patterns and lines are easier to see if they are at least two squares/two stitches thick. That doesn’t mean you can never do things one stitch thick. It just means be careful with the width of designs.

I worked up the second design with thicker lines. It turned out much better. Check out the pattern on the Intarsia for Special Olympics post.

Many shapes can be turned into charts using grid or graph paper. Here’s a few tips to make it happen.

Tip 2: Determine the dimensions required ahead of time if that’s critical.

For instance, draw a rectangle or side lines for the outer limits of your project or graph work. I wanted a symmetrical shape for a scarf only 6 inches wide so I drew a square 23 x 23 on my graph paper then worked on the snowflake inside those lines.

Tip 3: If the shape is not symmetrical from top to bottom and it is going on a project like a scarf, the shape needs to be flipped upside down for the second half of the project.

I completed one scarf before I realized the image looked upside down on half the scarf. Technically stars don’t have tops or bottoms so it was fine, this time!

Tip 4: If you don’t want the image to go all the way to the sides/ends of the project, be sure to include “blank” spaces around the shape on the graph/chart.

Sometimes you can add the extra rows or stitches on your own, but it’s easy to forget them if they are not included on the chart.

Tip 5: For larger images, each square on the graph paper may represent more than one stitch, though it would may also need to represent more than one row.

Large or intricate images may require multiple sheets of graph paper to draw out to scale. Though cumbersome, it could save time when actually making the project.

Tip 6: Patterns will work up differently if you use sc, hdc, or dc. Sc usually makes square stitches. Hdc and dc makes taller stitches and will elongate the shape.

Using hdc for the star pattern made long stars. I think it would have looked better in shorter stitches. This may turn out to be a matter of personal preference.

These tips should get you started. There is almost no limit to what you can crochet. If you can graph it, you can crochet it!

Fair Isle for Special Olympics

Many states are collecting scarves for the 2011 Special Olympics. And because I can’t do anything basic, I decided to make some scarves with Fair Isle! Thanks to Peggy Jean Kaylor and Crafty Knit Chicks for the Special Olympics logo and star graphs. Wanting to create a little Fair Isle work myself, I came up with a snowflake chart/grid, with the help of my sister. (I gave my sister the first pattern, which didn’t turn out too well! My second attempt turned out much better.)

The graph for the Special Olympics logo can by found on Ravelry. The star chart can be found at the Crafty Knit Chicks website. Though they are both written as knit patterns, they both can be crocheted using single crochet. I did the star with half double crochet, but that elongated the star a little bit.

The scarves are approximately 23 stitches wide. Per the requirements, the scarves are crocheted with Red Heart blue and turqua yarn. They are all approximately 6 inches wide x 54-60 inches long. They were made with a size H hook, though the requirements for the Olympics scarves project doesn’t mandate a specific pattern or hook size.

Not sure what Fair Isle knitting or crocheting is? Check out my post on Fair Isle vs. Intarsia.

Snowflake Scarf pattern – PDF

Basic snowflake scarf instructions

Pattern

Color A

Chain 23

Row 1: sc in 2nd chain from hook and each stitch across. Chain 1, turn.

Row 2: (1sc, 1dc) in 2nd chain from hook. Skip the next stitch. *(1 sc, dc) in next stitch, skip next stitch* across to the last two stitches. Sc in last two stitches.

Rows 3-25: Follow the pattern on the chart using sc for each stitch. Chain 1 and turn at the end of each row. (The chart can be found here in the Snowflake Scarf pattern.)

Color A for the X’s, color B on the blank spots.

Row 26: Repeat row 2

Row 27: Chain 3 (count as first dc). (Dc, ch-1, 2dc) in next stitch. Skip 3 stitches. *(2dc, ch1, 2dc) in next stitch* across. The last dc should be made in the last stitch.

Row 28: Repeat row 2 except skip all the ch-1 spaces of the previous row.

Row 29-30: Repeat rows 27 and 2.

Row 31: Chain 3, dc across.

Repeat Row 31 until the scarf measures approximately 50 inches in length (about 76 rows).

Row 107-110: Repeat rows 2 and 27 twice.

Row 111: Repeat row 2.

Rows 112-134: follow the snowflake chart.

Row 135: Repeat row 2.

Row 136: Sc across. Tie off; weave in end.

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