Side-view Mirror Cozy – Rectangle


A side-view mirror cozy/cover is a quick way to personalize a vehicle, whether yours or someone else’s.   (The ninja was for my husband. The dog paw was a yarn bomb on my brother-in-law!) While I can’t give specific directions to fit every side-view mirror, I can give basic directions that will work for most rectangular shaped mirrors (or mirrors that are kind of rectangular in shape).  For a mostly rectangular shaped mirror, you will crochet a rectangle, then make it 3-dimensional by doing the sides. By leaving one of the edges unconnected, the cozy can be brought around the front and buttoned closed so that it can be quickly attached or removed. The pictures below will explain.

Click Side-view Mirror Cozy – Rectangle for a PDF version.

Materials:

Yarn: Acrylic medium worsted weight of your choice. I chose black so that it would be a little subtle and because that was the color of the mirror to begin with. I don’t think my husband would cotton to a bright colored mirror cozy!

Hook: Size L (or size desired to get gauge or tightness of stitches)

Needle: If you plan to decorate the cozy, a large needle will be needed to sew on objects.

Button: The button should fit between stitches but not be so little that it doesn’t stay fastened.

Abbreviations:

Dc = double crochet

Sc = single crochet

Step 1: Measure

First, measure the size of the mirror: back, top, bottom, and sides. There should be somewhat of a basic rectangular shape to the back of the mirror. If you are lucky, the two sides will be a similar size and the top and bottom will be similar. If not, you may have to change your stitches as you go. The mirror above is basically 9 inches wide, 6 inches tall, and 2.5 inches deep.

Step 2: Gauge

With a size L hook, I get about 3 stitches and 2 rows to an inch. With a size H hook, I get about 4 stitches per inch.

Step 3: Make the Base Rectangle

Using a size L hook, figure 3 stitches per inch. Multiply the number of inches the back of the mirror is from side to side by 3. (My mirror was 9 inches wide. 9×3=27). That’s how many chains stitches to make.

Chain 27 (or however many your mirror needs.)

Row 1: Chain 2 more (to count as the first dc). Dc in 4th chain from hook and each chain across. (27)

Row 2: Chain 2 (count as first dc), turn, dc across.

Row 3-7: Chain 2, turn, dc across. (*Note: you may need to do more or fewer than 7 rows depending on the height of your mirror.)

Step 4: Make the Sides/Top/Bottom

Determine which corner of the rectangle will go where the mirror attaches to the side of the vehicle. For instance, while looking at the back of the driver’s side mirror, the corner that attaches to the vehicle is usually the bottom left corner. In that case, the left side will not be attached to the bottom part of the project as it is made. (See picture above. Cozy pictured is facing the wrong way. It looks like the bottom right is not attached, but when it is turned and put on the truck, it will be the bottom left. If you do the wrong side, the cozy can be turned inside out and used!)

Row 8: Chain 2, turn; dc to the end. Turn the work to crochet down the side. Make 2 dc on each dc post to the end. Turn the work to crochet along the bottom (which was your initial chain). Dc in each stitch to the end. Turn the work to crochet along the last side. Work 2 dc on each dc post to the end. DO NOT JOIN! Chain 2, turn.

Row 9: Dc in each stitch around. Chain 2, turn.

Row 10: Dc in each stitch around.

(*Note: You  may want to check the project on the mirror it will go on, if possible. This will give you an idea of whether you need to do any more rows.)

Continue making dc rows until the width of the mirror is met. It is best if the cozy fits snuggly.

Row 11/Last Row: Sc dec (sc 2 together) around. Do not join. Cut yarn, weave in end.

Make sure the cozy fits. Figure out which corner you will sew the button to.

Sew on the button.

Crochet decorations or add decorations as desired. See pattern below for dog paw print.

Large Paw Pad

Chain 5

Row 1: Skip the first 3 chains. Dc in last two  chains. Chain 2, turn.

Row 2: Dc in 3rd from hook, dc, 2 dc in last stitch. Chain 2, turn.

Row 3: Dc in 3rd from hook, 3 dc, 2 dc in last  stitch. Chain 2, turn.

Row 4: Dc in 3rd from hook, dc, 3 slip stitch, dc, 2 dc in last stitch

Toes (make 4):

Chain 2

Row 1: Sc in 2nd chain from hook. Chain 1, turn.

Row 2: 2 sc in the stitch, chain 1, turn.

Row 3: 2sc, chain 1, turn

Row 3: 1 sc dec (single crochet 2 together). Cut yarn leaving a long tail for sewing.

Notes

*Some mirrors may have tapered sides that are narrower at the top and wider at the bottom. In this case, I suggest making sc’s along the narrow sections and dc on the wider sections. For example, when working on the side piece, do half the stitches dc and half of them sc (or a third of each with hdc stitches in between). This will allow for the cozy to fit more snuggly and prevent the cozy from covering up too much of the mirror on the front.

**These directions are made with dc’s around. This leaves gaps between stitches, but allows the cozy to stretch more easily. The cozy can be made with sc’s. Simply adjust for gauge. It will more than likely start with the same number of stitches on the foundation chain, just require more rows to get the height and depth.

Adapting Patterns, Variations on a Theme

Often we fall in love with knit and crochet patterns based on completed projects we see. Sometimes, however, the project isn’t quite to our liking. Learning to see through projects to what they could be when adapted will increase your options.

Mr. and Mrs. Sock Monkey

Case in point, my sister wanted a sock monkey ski helmet cover. Up to this point I had only crocheted a sock monkey hat. Rather than wait for a pattern to appear online, I used the basic directions for the sock monkey hat and adapted it where it needed it. Since I was making one for her husband as well, I decided to make them Mr. & Mrs. Sock Monkey. Simple adaptations in the form of eyelashes and longer stranded pom-poms feminized it. Adaptations in the form of increased rows and sizes of rows helped them fit on the helmets. I also decreased around the brim so it would naturally hug the helmet and stay on.

A simpler adaptation to make is changing color. It is amazing how different a project looks when done in a different color. For Christmas I made five ponies from the same pattern. I hate to say it but some of them were cuter because of the color of yarn! The more colorful ones reminded me of the “My Little Pony” toys. I also made other adaptations based on recipient request. One pony became a unicorn. Another a Pegasus. For the Pegasus, I followed the directions for the wings of a dragon. This simple change saved me lots of time in trying to create a wing pattern. The horn I had to made on my own.

Thinking back on my childhood, I remembered how enamored I was with horses that had stars on their foreheads. The simple adaptation of a second color made the brown pony unique.

I hate to say that the color can make or break the project, but it is true. There have been times where the project I made just didn’t work for me because of the colors I chose. It’s a little disheartening when you spend so many hours on the project!

Making adaptations is easier to do when you have experience making similar projects. I made a Max doll from “Where the Wild Things Are” for my nephew. There were a few aspects of the original pattern I didn’t like. Because I had made a similar sized doll before, I used the leg construction of the other doll to make the legs for Max. I also made a different crown because I didn’t like the one in the pattern. Minor adjustments to the eyes, nose and hair, and I was much happier with the doll.

I followed the entire pattern for the giraffe project (below) except for the spots. It called for sewed spots. I wasn’t sure I would do them adequately so I crocheted each spot. In the end it was probably the longer/slower way to make the spots, but I was happy with the result. It was a minor change, but had a significant impact aesthetically.

Adapting patterns may require extra time and reworking of various sections, but they can be well worth the effort. Give yourself plenty of time to play with the pattern and don’t be afraid to experiment with color. You may not like every change you’ve made, but that will add to your knowledge of the craft and help you make future decisions.

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